Blooming now on the Gettysburg Battlefield

Bloodroot

Bloodroot

On walks this week through Gettysburg National Military Park, I have encountered  beautiful blooming Pennsylvania native wildflowers.  These shots are from April 16 and 17, 2013 at Culp’s Hill, Power’s Hill and at the park Museum and Visitor Center.

Dutchmen's breeches resemble a pair of pantaloons hanging upside down.

Dutchmen’s breeches resemble a pair of pantaloons hanging upside down.

Mayapples look like little green umbellas.  They are not yet blooming, but marching along.

Mayapples look like little green umbellas. They are not yet blooming, but marching along. Dutchmen’s breeches are blooming at the right.

Spring only seems to stay for a few short weeks so if you can, get out and enjoy these flowers.   One needs only to walk or jog along Gettysburg’s historic avenues and roadways to enjoy them.

 

Cutleaf toothwort

Cutleaf toothwort

The leaves of the Trout lilly resemble a spechled fish.

The leaves of the Trout lilly resemble a speckled fish.

Serviceberry, right in front of the Museum and Visitor Center

Serviceberry, right in front of the Museum and Visitor Center

Even the trees and shrubs are blooming, including the native landscaping around the Museum and Visitor Center.   

The variety of habitats within the park ranging from forests to wetlands provides home to 553 species of vascular plants, 410 of which are native. The Pennsylvania Natural Diversity Inventory has also listed 23 of these plants as endangered, threatened, or species of special concern.  For more information about plants in the park go to: http://www.nps.gov/gett/naturescience/plants.htm.

Redbud - one of the best loved trees at Gettysburg.

Redbud – one of the best loved trees at Gettysburg.

By taking a walk or jog through the park, you’ll improve your own health and well-being.  To learn more about National Park Service initiatives to encourage park visitors to make healthy lifestyle choices, check out “A Call to Action.”

Katie Lawhon, Management Assistant, April 18, 2013

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One Response to Blooming now on the Gettysburg Battlefield

  1. Bonita A. Portzline says:

    Every springtime, I check for these same flowers and blooms—some of which are gone as quickly as they pop up or out. Great to see park nature featured! I believe that it, too, must be preserved.

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