Gettysburg 151st Anniversary Schedule

Image

151st Anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg Commemoration

The three day battle of Gettysburg marked a turning point not only in the course of the American Civil War, but also for the future of the United States of America. Join Park Rangers and Licensed Battlefield Guides during the 151st Anniversary for a series of free guided walks and talks that discuss, explore, and reflect on this important chapter in our nation’s history.

Note: On all park avenues please park your vehicle on the right side of the road, unless otherwise directed, with all wheels on the pavement.

Daily Ranger-Guided Programs
Tuesday, July 1 – Thursday, July 3

The Battle of Gettysburg: An Overview (30 minutes) – Want to understand the basics of the battle before you get out on the field? This is the program for you! Meet in the Ford Education Center inside the Museum and Visitor Center, daily at 10:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M.

Lincoln and the Soldiers’ National Cemetery (40 minutes) – Explores the meaning and cost of the Battle of Gettysburg, and of Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address. Find out how the National Cemetery was established, who is buried there, and why Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address still has meaning for us today. Meet at the Taneytown Road entrance to the National Cemetery, daily at 11:00 A.M. and 3:00 P.M.

Care of the Wounded (1 hour) – Over 27,000 soldiers were wounded in the Battle of Gettysburg. Explore how these men were evacuated, treated, and ultimately, how most of their lives were saved. Meet at Ranger Program Site 2 behind the Museum and Visitor Center, daily at 3:00 P.M.

Civil War Soldier (1 hour) – Over 160,000 soldiers participated in the Battle of Gettysburg. Find out why they enlisted, why they fought, and what they endured during the four years of the American Civil War. Meet at Ranger Program Site 1 behind the Museum and Visitor Center, daily at 2:00 P.M.


 

Family Activities Tent
Tuesday, July 1 – Thursday, July 3

During the 151st Anniversary children of all ages can visit the Family Activities Tent at the Gettysburg National Military Park Museum and Visitor Center. Discover hands-on history stations, hourly special guest appearances called “Guess Who’s Coming to 2014”, and “Join the Army” programs to learn more about the people involved in, and affected by, the battle of Gettysburg.  You can also pick up and check in your Junior Ranger activity booklets there.  After your visit, you can get involved in Junior Ranger programs in other parks, and on the internet at http://www.nps.gov/webrangers!

Family Activities Tent Hours: July 1 – 2 from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., and July 3 from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.


 

Special Programs – Tuesday, July 1

Battle Walks
These special 2- to 3-hour programs explore key episodes and phases of the battle and involve significant hiking and walking, occasionally over rough terrain. Water, headgear, sun protection, insect repellent and comfortable, sturdy walking shoes are highly recommended.

 10:00 a.m.
“Hold at Any Cost!” – The Sacrifice of the 16th Maine

Late on the afternoon of July 1, 1863, as Confederate forces descended like an avalanche upon the wavering Union lines north and west of Gettysburg, Colonel Charles Tilden and his 275 soldiers in the 16th Maine Infantry were asked to make a forlorn stand on Oak Ridge and to sacrifice themselves for the greater good. Divisional commander John Robinson ordered Tilden to hold the position “at any cost” in order to buy some time to allow the rest of his command to escape from the closing Confederate vise.  The stand of the 16th Maine remains one of Gettysburg’s most remarkable stories—a story of heroism and of sacrifice—but it is a story that often gets overlooked. Join Park Ranger John Hoptak as he relates the dramatic stand of the 16th Maine at Gettysburg, and walk in the footsteps of this regiment on July 1, 1863.

Meet at the Eternal Light Peace Memorial, Stop 2 on the Auto Tour. Park along Buford and North Confederate Avenue.

2:30 p.m.
Carry the Hill…if Practicable” – Robert E. Lee and the Confederate High Command

As the sun set on July 1, 1863, the Army of Northern Virginia stood victorious and the southern Confederacy seemed on the cusp of independence. Yet, the Union army was rallying on Cemetery Hill. One more push and the war might be over. Join Ranger Matt Atkinson and explore the Confederate command decisions at the end of the first day of battle.

Meet at Stop 1 on the Battlefield Auto Tour. Park along Reynolds Avenue.

6:00 p.m.
“Not without a Fight” Krzyzanowski’s Brigade Struggles for the 11th Corps Line

The Army of the Potomac’s 11th Corps battle line north of Gettysburg on July 1st, 1863 had great defects. It fell to the men of Col. Vladimir Krzyzanowski’s brigade to correct them. Their vigorous fighting, under tremendous pressure, would disprove the low reputation often consigned to the German immigrant troops. Join Licensed Guide Ralph Siegel for this moderate walk over the fields where Krzyanowski’s men faced the enemy that day.

Meet at the tennis courts on Mummasburg Road on the northern edge of town.  Parking is available at Barlow’s Knoll and along East Howard Avenue. Do not park on West Howard Avenue.

Real Time Programs
These 30- to 45-minute programs provide a brief overview of key moments during the battle of Gettysburg at the time they occurred, 151 years ago.

9:00 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.
Two Armies Collide: The Battle Begins – John Nicholas
Meet at Auto Tour Stop 1, McPherson Ridge. Park on Stone Avenue.

1:30 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Ewell Attacks Oak Ridge – Bert Barnett                       
Meet at Auto Tour Stop 2, The Eternal Light Peace Memorial.
Park on North Confederate Avenue.

2:30 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.
The Battle for Herbst Woods – Jim Flook
Meet at the West End Guide Station, Stone Avenue

3:45 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.
Collapse of the 11th Corps – Nate Hess
Meet at Barlow’s Knoll, East Howard Avenue

5:00 p.m. – 5:45 p.m.
Cemetery Hill: The End of the 1st Day – Chuck Teague
Meet at the Baltimore Street Entrance to the Soldiers’ National Cemetery



Campfire at Pitzer Woods
Over the three days of the battlefield anniversary Park Rangers and Licensed Battlefield Guides will present hour-long presentations, offering unique perspectives on the significance of events 151 years ago. Held nightly at 8:30 p.m. at the Pitzer Woods Amphitheater, Battlefield Auto Tour Stop 6.

“Each Day Brings its own Challenges:” July 1, 1863 – Ranger Bill Hewitt
July 1, 1863. About 1 a.m. Men in both armies wonder, “What will this day bring?” In Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar the lines are: “If a man were to know the end of this day’s business ‘ere it come. But it suffices that the day will end and then the end be known. And if we meet again, well then we’ll smile. And if not, then this parting was well made.”  What does each army know at the beginning of the day on July 1, 1863?  How will the soldiers on each side prepare for the eventful day and who will not live to see its conclusion?

GETT_150_Jul1_BattleNorthofTown_LB_058


 Special Programs – Wednesday, July 2

Battle Walks
These special 2- to 3-hour programs explore key episodes and phases of the battle and involve significant hiking and walking, occasionally over rough terrain. Water, headgear, sun protection, insect repellent and comfortable, sturdy walking shoes are highly recommended.   

10:00 a.m.
“The Strongest Position by Nature Upon Which to Fight a Battle”The Stories of Cemetery Hill

Cemetery Hill witnessed more than its share of dramatic scenes during the battle of Gettysburg: the rallying place for battered Union troops and a showdown over field command on July 1; a gallant charge that almost wrested it from Union hands; the deadly contest between sharpshooters; and its role as a dominant platform for Union artillery.  It was, as one officer explained, “…the commanding point of the whole position.” Accompany Park Historian John Heiser and discover the events that made this hill, a portion of which has been recently rehabilitated, a major part of the Gettysburg saga.

Meet at the Hancock Equestrian Monument on East Cemetery Hill. Parking is available at the National Cemetery Lot.

2:30 p.m.
“Truth is Eternal” James Longstreet on July 2

What role did Lt. Gen. James Longstreet play on the afternoon of July 2, 1863? Join Ranger Karlton Smith and discuss Longstreet’s role as a corps commander, his relationship with Robert E. Lee, and his performance and motivations on the second day of the battle. What were the Confederate battle plans that day and why did they go awry?

Meet at Auto Tour Stop 6, Pitzer Woods. Park at Pitzer Woods and along West Confederate Avenue.

6:00 p.m.
“The Bullets Came Thick And Close”The 137th New York Regiment at Culp’s Hill

The defense of the Union left on Little Round Top by Colonel Joshua Chamberlain and the 20th Maine on July 2, 1863 has become a touchstone for courage and determination at Gettysburg. However, the stubborn defense of Culp’s Hill by Col. David Ireland’s 137th New York Infantry was at least as decisive, and may well have diverted a direct assault on the all-important Union supply line on the Baltimore Pike. Join Licensed Guide John Archer and walk in the footsteps of these New Yorkers and explore the lesser known struggle for Culp’s Hill.

Meet at the Culp’s Hill Observation Tower. Park along Williams and Slocum Avenue.

Real Time Programs
These 30 to 45-minute programs provide an overview of key moments during the battle of Gettysburg at the time at which they occurred 151 years ago.

11:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Lee and Meade Plan for Battle – Troy Harman
Meet at the Meade Equestrian Statue, Hancock Avenue.

1:30 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Skirmish in Pitzer Woods – Chris Gwinn
Meet at Auto Tour Stop 6, Pitzer Woods.

3:00 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.
Longstreet Prepares to Attack – John Hoptak
Meet at Auto Tour Stop 7, The Alabama Memorial.

4:15 p.m.  – 4:45 p.m.
The Fight for Little Round Top – Allyson Perry
Meet at the Warren Statue, Little Round Top.

5:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Devil’s Den and Houck’s Ridge – Brian Henry
Meet at Devil’s Den. Do not park on Wheatfield Road.

5:45 p.m. – 6:15 p.m.
The Bloody Wheatfield – Jim Flook
Meet at Auto Tour Stop 9, The Wheatfield. Do not park on Wheatfield Road.

6:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
Union Collapse at the Peach Orchard – Bert Barnett
Meet at Auto Tour Stop 10, The Peach Orchard. Do not park on Wheatfield Road.

7:20 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Crisis at the Union Center – Matt Atkinson
Meet at Auto Tour Stop 12, The Pennsylvania Memorial. Park along Hancock Avenue.

8:15 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.
Night Fighting on East Cemetery Hill – Chuck Teague
Meet at the Baltimore Street Entrance to the Soldiers’ National Cemetery.

Campfire at Pitzer Woods
Over the three days of the battlefield anniversary Park Rangers and Licensed Battlefield Guides will present hour-long presentations, offering unique perspectives on the significance of events 151 years ago. Held nightly at 8:30 p.m. at the Pitzer Woods Amphitheater, Battlefield Auto Tour Stop 6.


July 2nd: The Photographic Legacy of Gettysburg’s Bloodiest Day – Licensed Guides Gary Adelman and Tim Smith

Experience a photographic tour of Gettysburg’s most iconic places—Little Round Top, the Wheatfield, the Peach Orchard, Devil’s Den, the Rose and Trostle farms, Culp’s Hill and East Cemetery Hill. Through the many photos taken in the 1860s at these places, and in the decades that followed, Adelman and Smith will photographically trace Gettysburg’s battle, battlefield, memorialization and commercialization to peer into Gettysburg’s past in a manner available nowhere else.

The Liberty Rifles approach.



Special Programs –
Thursday, July 3

Battle Walks
These special 2- to 3-hour programs explore key episodes and phases of the battle and involve significant hiking and walking, occasionally over rough terrain. Water, headgear, sun protection, insect repellent and comfortable, sturdy walking shoes are highly recommended.   

10:00 a.m.
Meade Refuses the Extreme Left after Chamberlain’s Charge

Join Ranger Troy Harman and explore the real and perceived dangers to the federal left flank after the victory on Little Round Top, and the measures taken by Maj. Gen. Meade to secure it. Retrace the army’s refused flank, and explore existing defensive works built by the 5th Corps well into the early morning hours of July 3. The program will also explore Lt. Gen. James Longstreet’s proposed flanking maneuver behind the Rounds Tops on July 3.

Meet at the 20th Maine Monument, Little Round Top. Parking available at Little Round Top, Devil’s Den, and the Big Round Top Parking Lots. Parking is also available along South Confederate Avenue.

2:30 p.m.
“Who will you follow?” – Pickett’s Charge and the Story of the Common Soldier

Visitors are invited to join Rangers Philip Brown, Bill Hewitt, and Jim Flook to follow in the footsteps of three Confederate units that took part in Pickett’s Charge, the climactic moment of the battle of Gettysburg. Who were the men that made this assault, what motivated them, and what did they experience in the fields between Seminary and Cemetery Ridge.

Meet at the Virginia Memorial, Auto Tour Stop 5. Park along West Confederate Avenue.

6:00 p.m.
An Unceasing Procession of Stretchers” – The Journey of the Wounded from Cemetery Ridge to the George Spangler Farm

Join Ranger Christopher Gwinn and Dan Welch of the Gettysburg Foundation and follow the path of the wounded from Cemetery Ridge to field hospitals behind the Union lines, where surgeons, nurses, and volunteers struggled to save the torn and bleeding casualties of the battle. How were the wounded evacuated from the field of battle, where were they taken, and what were the physical, psychological, and emotional consequences of the fighting at Gettysburg? This journey will conclude at the George Spangler Farm, one of the best preserved Civil War field hospitals in the country.

Meet at the High Water Mark, Auto Tour Stop 15. Parking available at the National Cemetery Lot, the Museum and Visitor Center, and along Hancock Avenue.

Real Time Programs
These 30- to 45-minute programs provide a brief overview of key moments during the battle of Gettysburg at the time at which they occurred 151 years ago.

8:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.                 
Disaster in Spangler Meadow – Philip Brown

Meet at Auto Tour Stop 13, Spangler’s Spring.
Park on East Confederate and Williams Avenue.

8:45 a.m. – 9:15 a.m.
Counter-Attack at Pardee Field – Casimer Rosiecki
Meet at the Auto Tour Stop 13, Spangler’s Spring
Park on East Confederate and Williams Avenue.

10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.
The Bliss Farm in Flames – Scott Adrian
Meet at the Abraham Brian Farm. Park on Hancock Avenue.

11:30 p.m. – 12:15 p.m.
Lee and Longstreet at Odds – Bill Hewitt
Meet at the Peach Orchard. Park on North Sickles or United States Avenue.
Do not park on Wheatfield Road.

1:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.
The Cannonade – Bert Barnett
Meet at the High Water Mark, Auto Tour Stop 15. Park on Hancock Avenue.

3:30 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.
Union Defense of Cemetery Ridge – Karlton Smith
Meet at Meade Equestrian Monument.
Park on Hancock Avenue or National Cemetery Parking Lot.

In the Path of Battle: Open House at the Abraham Brian Farm – Thursday, July 3
Abraham Brian, an African American citizen of Gettysburg, owned a small plot of land along Cemetery Ridge, just south of the town. The humble farm owned and worked by the Brian family would be transformed into the scene of unimaginable horror and destruction during the fighting at Gettysburg on July 3, 1863. You’re invited to explore inside the Brian family farmhouse and discover the stories of this African American family caught up in the turmoil of the battle of Gettysburg. Join Park Rangers Allyson Perry, Casimer Rosiecki, and Jasmine Burnett, between 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. for this special opportunity.

Campfire at Pitzer Woods
Over the three days of the battlefield anniversary Park Rangers and Licensed Battlefield Guides will present hour-long presentations, offering unique perspectives on the significance of events 151 years ago. Held nightly at 8:30 p.m. at the Pitzer Woods Amphitheater, Battlefield Auto Tour Stop 6.

Pickett’s Charge: 150 Years in the Making – Ranger Jared Frederick
Pickett’s Charge remains the iconic moment of the Battle of Gettysburg–perhaps even the Civil War as a whole. Join Jared Frederick on an historical journey as we gain an understanding of the place, the people, the memories, and the clashing ideals that brought this pivotal moment to the forefront of national identity. Experience Pickett’s Charge and its unique legacies through the literature, art, movies, reunions, and park history that have indelibly shaped our perceptions of this “turning point.

GETT_150_Jul3_BattleforCulps_JM_042

About The Staff

Staff of Gettysburg National Military Park
Aside | This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s