Gettysburg at 24 degrees

A path across the fields of Pickett's Charge at Gettysburg.

A path across the fields of Pickett’s Charge at Gettysburg National Military Park.

As we enjoy another winter here at Gettysburg National Military Park, the park staff invite you to remember that a winter’s walk on the Gettysburg battlefield offers a terrific opportunity to study topography as well as a time for quiet reflection.

The fields of Longstreet's attack on July 2nd, 1863, with the Bushman farm on the left (red brick) and the Slyder farm in the center (white).

The Bushman farm with Little Round Top in the background, taken from South Confederate Avenue.

Newly built fences, replanted orchards, and long-lost meadows and farm lanes that have been reestablished help visitors see the battlefield the way soldiers did at the time of the fighting in July 1863.

The Witness Tree at Sickles' headquarters, United States Avenue.

The Witness Tree at Sickles’ headquarters marker, United States Avenue.

A Licensed Battlefield Guide gives a tour to a visiting school group.

A Licensed Battlefield Guide gives a tour to a visiting school group.

On Tuesday of this week I took a drive on Gettysburg National Military Park’s tour route, stopping to look around and enjoy some of the incredible views and catching a few pictures of our most hardy park visitors enjoying a visit in spite of the 24 degree temperature.

Reading the names on the Pennsylvania Memorial.

Reading the names on the Pennsylvania Memorial.

Frozen Plum Run, viewed from the Codori Farm Lane.

Frozen Plum Run, viewed from the Trostle farm lane.

While you’re here, don’t forget to stop in for one of our free “Winter Lectures” happening Saturdays and Sunday throughout January, February and

March, at 1:30 p.m. Download the full list of Winter Lectures here.

Also, please be aware that snow storms and freezing rain occasionally cause the closure of some roads and buildings in Gettysburg National Military Park. For updates keep an eye on the park’s Facebook page or call 717 334-1124.

 

Lots of animal tracks are visible in the snow, like these deer tracks on the Trostle farm lane.

Lots of animal tracks are visible in the snow, like these deer tracks on the Trostle farm lane.

Katie Lawhon, Management Assistant, January 15, 2015

 

 

 

 

About The Staff

Staff of Gettysburg National Military Park
This entry was posted in Battlefield Farms, Natural History, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Gettysburg at 24 degrees

  1. Great photos! I’ve never visited Gettysburg in January, but I have at the end of February . . . standing on the summit of Little Round Top on a breezy day gave new meaning to the phrase “chilled to the bone.” Still, a wonderful place!

  2. donna belski says:

    I love these pictures!!! Gettysburg is such a special place, it doesn’t what season it is. We usually visit in the summer and fall, but I am sure it is very beautiful in winter. We have been coming here for 20 years and we still marvel at this wonderful hallowed ground.

  3. Rochelle Ebling says:

    My husband and I spent a late January weekend in Gettysburg last year–walked a long loop around the Park. It was awesome, had the Park to ourselves and nature. Took in the mid-winter lectures which are always educational. And the motels have great winter rates to boot. Hmmm…might book a weekend again real soon!

  4. admin11states says:

    A bit late to this post, but I found the pictures remarkably beautiful and just wanted to leave comment saying as much. Thank you for sharing them.

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