Category Archives: Battlefield Farms

Improving Water Quality on the Gettysburg Battlefield

“We all live downstream.” You have probably heard this before and it is very true. The quality of the water we drink, the waters we swim in on a hot summer day and the waters we fish in is determined … Continue reading

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“The enemy were on the gun and limber…” Gunner John Norwood’s narrow escape at Gettysburg.

One of most harrowing stories of the battle of Gettysburg is the experience of the 9th Massachusetts Battery. Told again and again through publications and by the monuments that mark the battery’s position at the park, it’s near destruction adjacent … Continue reading

Posted in 9th Massachusetts Battery, Battlefield Farms, Battlefield Legends and Lore, Gettysburg Art, Historical Memory, Veterans | Tagged , | 6 Comments

A Victory on South Cavalry Field

Brig. Gen. Wesley Merritt is not a household name. Even among aficionado’s of the Battle of Gettysburg, Merritt’s involvement in the fighting on July 3rd, 1863 is often a footnote to a footnote, overshadowed by larger events occurring elsewhere at the … Continue reading

Posted in Battlefield Farms, Battlefield Preservation | 8 Comments

Gettysburg at 24 degrees

As we enjoy another winter here at Gettysburg National Military Park, the park staff invite you to remember that a winter’s walk on the Gettysburg battlefield offers a terrific opportunity to study topography as well as a time for quiet … Continue reading

Posted in Battlefield Farms, Natural History, Uncategorized | 4 Comments

The Widow and Her Farm

In comparison to other farm houses in rural Adams County in 1863, the home of Lydia Leister was non-descript. The wood frame and clapboarded house was very compact and humble, situated on a small, 9-acre farm that included a log barn, … Continue reading

Posted in Battlefield Farms, Civilians, George G. Meade | 9 Comments

Ranger programs at Gettysburg begin June 7

From June 7 through August ­­10, Gettysburg National Military Park will offer a variety of free ranger guided programs that explore the Battle of Gettysburg, care of the wounded, the Soldiers’ National Cemetery, President Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, the monuments of … Continue reading

Posted in Abraham Lincoln, Battlefield Farms, Burials, Interpretive Programs, Monuments at Gettysburg, Museum and Visitor Center, Soldiers' National Cemetery | 2 Comments

The busy season: a Gettysburg chore list

Got some spring cleaning to do around your home?  Imagine the tasks involved in sprucing up 1320 monuments, 410 cannon, 148 historic structures, 33 miles of paved historic avenues and roadways, 8 miles of historic dirt and gravel lanes, and … Continue reading

Posted in Battlefield Farms, Monuments at Gettysburg | Tagged , , , | 4 Comments

Cultural Landscape Report for Gettysburg’s first day’s battlefield

In my last two blogs I wrote about important Gettysburg National Military Park goals for fiscal year 2014: addressing challenges at Little Round Top, and continuing battlefield rehabilitation on North Cemetery Ridge at the site of the old Visitor Center … Continue reading

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Battlefield Rehab continues on Gettysburg’s Cemetery Ridge

This week we’ll look at another of Gettysburg National Military Park’s 2014 goals, the rehabilitation of North Cemetery Ridge   Since 2009 the park and the Gettysburg Foundation have been implementing phases of this project to return key portions of the … Continue reading

Posted in Battlefield Farms, Monuments at Gettysburg, Soldiers' National Cemetery, Uncategorized | Tagged , | 6 Comments

Fields of Conflict III: Rose Farm Damages, Claims, and Awards

  This is the third post on the Gettysburg battlefield farms.  This post will cover the compensations claims made by Francis Ogden, John Rose, and George Rose.  It offers a window into the confusion residents faced after the battle as … Continue reading

Posted in Battlefield Farms, Civilians, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | 4 Comments